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Prince Charles has reportedly branded Priti Patel ‘s plans to send migrants to Rwanda as “appalling”.

The Times reports the Prince of Wales is understood to be particularly frustrated at Boris Johnson’s asylum policy as he is getting set to represent his mum the Queen at the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, later this month.

Home Secretary Patel’s migrant policy will see those who arrive in Britain illegally face deportation 4,000 miles away to Rwanda, with the deal being struck in April.

A source reportedly heard Charles, 73, expressing his frustration at the policy, telling the newspaper: “He said he was more than disappointed at the policy.

“He said he thinks the government’s whole approach is appalling. It was clear he was not impressed with the government’s direction of travel.”

The migrant policy, founded in a deal struck by home secretary Priti Patel, will see those who arrive in Britain illegally face deportation 4,000 miles away to Rwanda ( PA)

Clarence House did not deny that the Prince of Wales was opposed to the migrant plan, in a comment given to The Mirror, but insisted he would not attempt to influence government policy.

A spokesperson said: “We would not comment on supposed anonymous private conversations with the Prince of Wales, except to restate that he remains politically neutral. Matters of policy are decisions for government.”

The Prince has been fairly vocal on issues close to his heart over the years, including environmental and climate change discussions.

The Prince of Wales is understood to be particularly frustrated at Boris Johnson’s asylum policy as the Prime Minister prepares to represent the Queen at the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting ( PA)

But on commenting on government policy, Charles has recently acknowledged that he will not have such freedom once he take the throne as King.

In a BBC documentary marking his 70th birthday in 2018, Charles said he would refrain from such interventions, saying: ” “I’m not that stupid.”

He added he would not be “able to do the same things I’ve done as heir” and as monarch would have to operate within “constitutional parameters”.

The Prince of Wales meets the President of Rwanda, Paul Kagame, at his residence, Highgrove House in Gloucestershire ( Alamy Stock Photo)

It comes after The High Court has today refused to block asylum seekers being deported to Rwanda next week.

Migrants due to be put on a one-way removal flight the east African nation, alongside campaign groups and a union, had asked judges to block their upcoming deportation flight.

But Judge Mr Justice Swift said there was a “material public interest” in allowing Priti Patel to be able to implement immigration control decisions.

He also said the risks in sending asylum seekers more than 4,000 miles away to one of the poorest countries in the world outlined by claimants were small and “in the realms of speculation”.

A group of people are brought in to Dover, Kent after arriving in the UK on small boats ( PA)

The court heard 31 people were due on the first flight on Tuesday, with the Home Office planning to schedule more this year.

“I do not consider that the balance of convenience favours the grant of the generic relief,” Mr Swift told the Court.

Shortly after the judgement, Mr Justice Swift gave claimants the permission to appeal at the Court of Appeal on Monday.

Sonya Sceats, chief executive of the charity Freedom From Torture, said: “We are disappointed that the court did not grant this injunction to ensure that nobody is sent to Rwanda before Boris Johnson ’s cruel policy can be subjected to proper legal scrutiny.

“But the fight is far from over. Caring people across Britain are incensed that this Government wants to send people seeking safety halfway across the world and are taking action.”

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